From our BASIC JOURNALISM section

Journalists and bloggers – stop stealing pictures

Copying images from the web and using them to illustrate news articles without permission is a global problem. Some think it's okay to use images without permission; it isn't and there's a better way.

What is news?

Here we consider what makes one thing worth reporting, while another thing is not. We offer a test for news which can work in all societies. We consider what makes some news stories stronger than others.

From our EDITORIAL ETHICS section

Respecting privacy as a journalist

Journalists face a difficult balancing act. They must respect privacy, but they must also be rigorous and robust in their investigation into issues that are in the public interest.

Accuracy in journalism

A media organisation will be judged on the accuracy and reliability of its journalism, which must be well-sourced, supported by strong evidence, examined and tested, clear and unambiguous. Verified facts must form the basis of all news, not rumour or speculation.

From our ADVANCED JOURNALISM section

How to run an effective news meeting

Have you ever attended a dull news meeting where people are slouched on chairs, lacking ideas and unresponsive when called on? Here are some ideas for ensuring that doesn't happen.

Information disorder – the essential glossary

For the policy-makers, technology companies, politicians, journalists, librarians, educators, academics, and civil society organisations all facing the challenges of information disorder, agreeing to a shared vocabulary is essential.

Media Helping Media Facebook Page

journalism training in Serbia. Image by David Brewer shared via Creative CommonsMedia Helping Media offers free training resources covering basic, advanced and investigative journalism, editorial ethics, media management and strategy, and staff training. We also have scenarios to test journalistic instincts. The site is supported by Fojo Media Institute.
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Tips for investigative journalism

The following are some of the points from a training session given by Marcus Tanner to the Balkan Fellowship for Journalistic Excellence setting out how to produce a piece of investigative journalism.

Avoiding the pitfalls of investigative journalism

Producing a piece of investigative journalism to international standards can be a daunting prospect. This guide is to help journalists avoid some of the pitfalls and problems often encountered.

Compiling an investigative journalism dossier

Discipline, order and a well thought out plan are essential for successful investigative journalism. It starts with the compilation of a solid dossier built with meticulous precision and executed with an attention to detail.

Prioritising production with the content value matrix

How to prioritise newsroom effort There are many demands on a newsroom. There is the routine flow of news releases and stage-managed events that need to...

Getting the best out of a news meeting

Most newsrooms hold regular news meetings where the editor sets out what news stories are going to be covered and invites the news team to offer ideas about how the news should be developed and covered.

Proactive journalism, ensuring issues are fully explored

Informing the public debate Sometimes journalists become lazy. When this happens, the news they produce becomes superficial and shallow. They take information at face value....

Adapting to changing audience behaviour

The challenge of keeping up with changing audience behaviour and ensuring that the content that is produced is available on all the devices the audience uses to access information.

The value of thorough research for media organisations

Why surveying the audience is important Knowing your audience, understanding the issues they face, and being aware of what they think about society - and...

Setting up a media business – four essential steps

A media business is like a table with four legs. These are the media organisation's target audience, the core editorial proposition that it offers to that audience, the values that the business holds dear, and the market that sustains the business. Each leg has to be strong and firm. If one leg is weak, the table wobbles. A shaky media organisation is not good.

Privacy protection – scenario

You are working on the online news desk of a large media organisation. News breaks of fighting overseas. Raw footage arrives showing identifiable dead bodies. What do you do?

Trespass and journalism – scenario

In this scenario we discuss whether it is every justified for a journalist to trespass in order to gather information that helps the audience better understand the issue being covered.

Emotional assumptions – scenario

Try our scenario on how to remain objective when reporting from a live event. It's about how to avoid 'heat of the moment' language and stick to facts.

The essential qualities of a media trainer

What it takes to be a media trainer Media trainers must have recent, valid experience of all they teach. They need to understand the pressures...

Five essential steps for media training

For international media training to be successful, tried, tested and proven case studies from a similar region are needed. Theory has limited value, as do examples of what works in the West.

Adopting the right attitude for media training

A trainer must not shout at participants or get into loud arguments. They must not make those attending their courses feel small or humiliate them. Some fairly strong points made by participants.