From our BASIC JOURNALISM section

How to improve your journalistic productivity

If you turn up for the daily news meeting without a story idea, you're in the wrong job. A journalist should be living and breathing stories 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

50 tips for budding journalists

A journalist must learn the house rules of the media organisations they are working for. All will have a set of guidelines and a style guide. But here are general tips about starting off in journalism.

From our EDITORIAL ETHICS section

Offence and journalism

Journalists must ensure that the material they use in coverage has a clear editorial purpose. Where that material is likely to offend, there need to be clear warnings of what is coming up.

Impartiality in journalism

Being impartial means not being prejudiced towards or against any particular side. All journalists have their own views, however they must learn to leave aside their own personal perspectives.

From our ADVANCED JOURNALISM section

How to set online news priorities

Increasingly, news websites are the product of a converged newsroom operating as a content factory and delivering information to whatever device the user turns to in order to access information.

Old news is no news, updates are essential

Journalism involves an ongoing commitment to update and rework the material we are producing to ensure that it remains relevant, reflects latest developments, and continues to inform.

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20 ways a suspect can help a journalist

Sources are one of the most valuable resources for a journalist. Without sourced information, the reports produced may end up being padded with rumour and personal opinion.

Avoiding the pitfalls of investigative journalism

Producing a piece of investigative journalism to international standards can be a daunting prospect. This guide is to help journalists avoid some of the pitfalls and problems often encountered.

Tips for investigative journalism

The following are some of the points from a training session given by Marcus Tanner to the Balkan Fellowship for Journalistic Excellence setting out how to produce a piece of investigative journalism.

Story weighting system for breaking news

Introducing a story weighting system helps prioritises effort on the stories that are of most value to the target audience, it saves time, speeds up production, and helps avoid wasted effort.

Proactive journalism, ensuring issues are fully explored

Informing the public debate Sometimes journalists become lazy. When this happens, the news they produce becomes superficial and shallow. They take information at face value....

Social media in news production and news dissemination

Social media is an increasingly disruptive force on the media landscape. It challenges traditional, mainstream media to reconsider how they operate.

Strategic forward planning for media organisations

This module looks at how media organisations need to plan ahead to produce original content that informs the public debate and covers the issues of most concern to the target audience.

Identifying the target audience and its information needs

The first step in setting up a media business is to identify the audience you plan to serve. You need to know their information needs so that you can better serve them.

The value of thorough research for media organisations

Knowing your audience, understanding the issues they face, and being aware of what they think about society - and your media organisation in particular - are important factors for fine-tuning what you offer in order to better inform the public debate.

Informed consent – scenario

You are a reporter covering a house fire where a traumatised woman talks to you on camera but after the interview you are made aware of the circumstances that could mean she didn't realise what she was saying. Do you use the interview?

Trespass and journalism – scenario

In this scenario we discuss whether it is every justified for a journalist to trespass in order to gather information that helps the audience better understand the issue being covered.

Returning ‘favours’ – scenario

In this scenario you are a parliamentary reporter being put under pressure to cover a story by a politician who says they did you a favour in the past.

How media assistance could improve

Trainers have as much to learn as they have to give. That’s the message to those offering media assistance in transition and post-conflict countries from some of those on the receiving end.

How to design a successful media training plan

A well-designed media training plan could make the difference between the success and the failure of a media business. Get it wrong and you could be adding to the problems you were asked to address.

Five essential steps for media training

For international media training to be successful, tried, tested and proven case studies from a similar region are needed. Theory has limited value, as do examples of what works in the West.